Cupping

Ease Nagging Shin Splints While Continuing To Run

Shin Splints seem to be one of the biggest nagging complaints I hear from a variety of runners.

While many times some simple warm up and strengthening exercises can help. Often times the discomfort continues to linger, and as mileage accumulates things can start to become more and more of an issue.

On Track Physio provides alternative solutions to address this very injury. We have seen this issue many times before and won't waste your time with exercises or stretches that you are already doing. 

As a collegiate track athlete myself, I know exactly what you are dealing with. I can talk with you about strengthening, stretching, and running form. But I also recognize that sometimes certain muscles tend to respond well to some TLC treatment. 

We offer cupping and dry needling as a treatment of choice, which tends to work well if you already have the basics down.

The pictures below show the recovery modalities we use which on contrary to popular belief are actually quite comfortable (or at least should be! You do not need to aggressively dig into these already aggravated tissues to get reults). 

Contact us today to see how we can help you continue doing what you love!

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Ann Arbor, Mi

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About the Author: Dr. Greg Schaible is a physical therapist/strength coach specializing in athletic performance. He attended The University of Findlay, graduating in 2013 with his Doctorate of Physical Therapy (DPT). As a Track and Field athlete, he was as a 5x Division II All-American and 6x Division II Academic All-American. Greg is the owner of On Track Physiotherapy in Ann Arbor, Mi. You can stay up to date with helpful information and news on Facebook.

Alfredson Protocol for Achilles Tendinopathy

If you have ever experienced an achilles injury or dealt with chronic achilles re-injuries or tendinopathy chances are your physician may have recommended something called the Alfredson Protocol.

This is an aggressive loading program with the intent of building back the strength and capacity back up in the tendon so that it can withstand normal daily movement as well as the activity levels your more than likely looking to regain. 

The Alfredson Protocol consists of 2 exercises performed for 3 sets of 15 reps that would be repeated 2x per day (which is a total of 180 reps every day). 

This is one of the exercises below. There are ways to make this activity easier or more challenging depending on the clients symptoms, strength, and skill level.

Now I know what you are thinking....thats a lot of reps, and that is probably going to hurt!

The reality is that this is a protocol which is standardized for research purposes. Many people do not do well with this aggressive approach. This approach is modified or altered depending on location of achilles pain as well. The exercises for mid achilles tendon pain are different than insertion (or at base of heel).

Having seen numerous achilles tendon cases before, we at On Track Physio have found that while this strengthening approach certainly works, we also need a menu of exercises to choose from which allows the client to perform the activity comfortably. 

Depending on your case and presentation we may also recommend less repetition or utilizing a heavier weight. This very much depends on the person.

Likewise, to make things even more comfortable, we have found that utilizing soft tissue techniques in conjunction with this will allow you to perform the exercise more comfortably. Below is a picture of cupping, which applies a distraction force to the tissue. This sensation seems to work better than compressive massage techniques possibly because achilles tendinopathy tend to be a repetitive compression based injury. In some instances we will perform dry needling, but not always.

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The more comfortable you are able to perform the exercises, the more likely we can continue to progress the exercises and perform them on a daily basis. On a daily basis is a very important part of this process, which is why once we determine the correct exercise for you, it's just a matter of doing it. We do not need to see you very often, we just need YOU to do the exercise daily and remove or modify the aggravating factors (something we will also help you do). Our goal is never to stop you from being active, however we may need to modify things slightly so that it gives the tendon a chance to recover.

To learn more about how we can help you with this process, apply for a free discovery session.

Ann Arbor, Mi

About the Author: Dr. Greg Schaible is a physical therapist/strength coach specializing in athletic performance. He attended The University of Findlay, graduating in 2013 with his Doctorate of Physical Therapy (DPT). As a Track and Field athlete, he was as a 5x Division II All-American and 6x Division II Academic All-American. Greg is the owner of On Track Physiotherapy in Ann Arbor, Mi. You can stay up to date with helpful information and news on Facebook.

Cupping Therapy for Longevity and Recovery

Ann Arbor, Mi - Cupping Therapy has been around for a long time. However, this year's Olympics has brought this type of soft tissue therapy to the forefront in the public.

It's only natural that when the most decorated Olympian of all time Michael Phelps has odd bruising circles on his shoulder, people start to wonder. Suddenly Cupping therapy became  a hot topic of discussion. 

On Track Physical Therapy in Ann Arbor, Mi utilizes cupping therapy as an adjunct to clients treatment programs.  

Before we go any further, understand that these athletes are on such a high level that they are looking for any advantage they can have over their opponents. Most of these athletes have access to a medical provider daily. They are often pushing their body to the max and training daily, so anything that can potentially aid in recovery is paramount.

To say what the general public or recreational athlete needs is the same as what an elite athlete would need, simply is not true. Most of the general public waits until they are injured before actually seeing a health professional. Furthermore, the general public doesn’t come close to seeing a health professional daily. More likely 1-3x per week when injured, or a couple times per year as a “tune up” if lucky. We will get into the potential advantages cupping may bring to the table in a moment. But the most important thing to remember about longevity and health is this: have a sense of ownership and control over your dysfunction, with something repeatable you can do on your own to improve/resolve the situation.

Cupping is dependent on a clinician to perform, as such, you cannot take this home with you. By default, the client does not have ownership or control of their pathology because the emphasis is on relying on a clinician.

Many times I will choose other treatments first and foremost because it is repeatable and the client can replicate the exercise/activity at home. Often this is the most efficient way to recovery as well as longevity because the client can perform it daily or as needed. Cupping on the other hand does not accomplish this.

What cupping can potentially accomplish is an altered sensation. Some might claim that cupping increases blood flow/lymphatics to help flush toxins. They would be correct, however what they don’t tell you is that simple aerobic exercise will do the same (get the heart pumping, it does some great things).

When cupping is performed, a distraction force is created on the skin. This skin distraction provides an altered sensation to the body. Altering sensation can at times be useful because it may alter the perception of pain. If it does, it provides us with an input that allows you to MOVE better. This ultimately needs to be followed up by some sort of movement or exercise that is repeatable to do at home, giving the individual client full control.

Below is an example of how I might use Cupping in practice. (I would always follow this up with some exercise that the client repeats at home on their own).

How might this be beneficial for recovery? It provides an altered sensation. Realize that soreness and stiffness from working out is a sensation as well. Altering sensation with a non-threatening or physically stressful input could potentially allow you to feel looser and as a result be more apt to continue moving/exercising/competing. The usefulness of this sensation ultimately varies from person to person. As a result, the benefit of this modality is merely up to your perception.

If you would like to try Cupping as a potential performance and recovery source, contact On Track Physical Therapy. If you are in pain and would like a full evaluation to determine the best plan of action (which may or may not include cupping) set up your FREE Discover Session today!

Sports Specialist Physical Therapy Clinic| Ann Arbor, Mi | FREE Discovery Session|

About the Author: Dr. Greg Schaible is a physical therapist and strength coach specializing in athletic performance. He attended The University of Findlay as a student athlete. As an athlete he competed in both Indoor and Outdoor Track & Field where he earned honors as a 5x Division II All-American and 6x Division II Academic All-American. In 2013 he completed Graduate School earning his Doctorate of Physical Therapy (DPT). Greg is the owner of On Track Physical Therapy in Ann Arbor, Mi. Follow On Track PT and Performance on Facebook.