Knee Pain Ann Arbor

2 Step Process To Fix Patellar Tendinitis Knee Pain

Patellar tendon issues are quiet common among the athletic and active adult populations. 

Here are some tell tale signs that you are dealing with a patellar tendon issue:

  1. Focal Inferior Patellar Pole Pain

  2. The pain is very localized and sharp

  3. The task you participate in requires a lot of repetitive running, jumping, or stopping. You may have been performing these tasks for a long period of time (weeks/months) or you performed these tasks much more frequently than you usually do in a short period of time.

Patellar Tendinitis or Tendinosis can affect both adolescents and adults, and the onset tends to vary between presentations. 

A major differential diagnosis we want to also be considering is patellar femoral pain syndrome (PFPS). This is a different subset of knee pain that usually presents as a diffuse ache about the knee cap and feels deeper or undernieth the patella. Both patellar femoral pain syndrome and patellar tendinitis have moderately different treatment strategies. 

For patellar femoral pain syndrome (PFPS) we need to focus our attention on more of the biomechanics of the knee to help reduce the pain levels. Then optimize a loading strategy to the joint and muscles to improve capacity and functional capabilities.

For Patellar Tendinitis we need to first control the amount of load the knee joint and tendon is undergoing. Which may require activity modification for the time being. Optimizing both resistance and dynamic loads to the knee to minimal-moderate pain levels is the first step in managing this injury and decreasing pain.

The second step includes finding the optimal loading strategy to return the knee back to previous levels of capacity. During this process, you also want to be sure and check that no biomechanical factors may be contributing to tendon overloading. But if the issue is 100% a tendon problem, changing biomechanics will have a much lower impact decreasing pain than with a person who displays patellar femoral pain (PFPS).

Below is a video demonstrating two exercises that I like to utilize for patellar tendon progressive loading. In general, one will move from an isometric exercise to a isotonic exercise that has progressive loading principals applied to it.

Please realize that these two exercises are not “cure” all treatment solution and many times you will need extra work done to completely abolish the pain and regain complete confidence in your knee!

These two exercises are a great place to start and trial. But to get yourself the best shot at getting back to the activities you enjoy without nagging pain, we offer a free discovery session to provide you clarity on how we can do this for you!

Ann Arbor Woman Overcomes Agonizing Pain Following a "Pop" In Her Knee

Ever have that moment in life when you stepped wrong or twisted unexpectedly and felt a "pop" in your knee? 

If this story sounds familiar, you are not alone!

In fact, we treat many people successfully who have experienced this very same knee injury

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It's very easy to believe that rest and ibuprofen will make it better....

You've probably already tried something like that before, after all that's the general advice you've probably come to expect when going to the doctor.

So if you are currently having difficulty with things like going up/down stairs or squatting know that it can get better!

But don't blame us if 6 weeks roll by and all you have tried is rest, ice, and ibuprofen with no noticeable change in both pain and your ability to do necessary things like go up/down stairs, yard work, and play with the kids or grandchildren.

The biggest factor in this injury is pressure.

Our bodies have developed tendencies over years of use on how we place pressure through our joints. The hip and foot are most notorious for this!

Think about it for a second. Does your foot turn outward all the time when you stand? Do you cross your legs a certain way when you sit? There are many more signs like this...

The first step is to bring your awareness to the daily habits continuously provoking the symptoms. Limit those habits for the time being while we work on things that not only help your pain, but also restore the capacity of your injured knee again.

This way you can be assured that you will in fact be able to go up/down stairs again uncompensated!

You will be able to squat without fear of it hurting or being "bad for your knees" (more poor advice from the doctor...how about you learn to do it properly to EVENLY distribute force through your legs instead of putting all the pressure directly to your knee).

And you will be able to play with your kids or grandkids again!

If you are looking to eliminate that daily annoying ache in the knee....Even if you felt a "pop" when it happened! Sign up for one of our FREE Discovery Sessions. Out of curtusy to our current clients, we limit these discovery session each week, so be sure you inquire today before the spaces fill up!

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About the Author: Dr. Greg Schaible is a physical therapist/strength coach specializing in athletic performance. He attended The University of Findlay, graduating in 2013 with his Doctorate of Physical Therapy (DPT). As a Track and Field athlete, he was as a 5x Division II All-American and 6x Division II Academic All-American. Greg is the owner of On Track Physiotherapy in Ann Arbor, Mi. You can stay up to date with helpful information and news on Facebook.

Why Your Knee Hurts With Squats and Stairs

Pain in the front or side of your knee?

Clicking or popping around the kneecap?

Don't be so quick to blame the knee! We see this all the time at On Track Physiotherapy. Client comes in with knee pain and has difficulty with squatting, stairs, etc. 

Often times people think that this is a knee issue. When quite often it actually has more to do with the hips and foot than anything. 

When people think about the knee, many believe that it just bends and straightens. When in reality there is actually a decent amount of rotation that is normal and should occur at the knee with various different tasks. 

This is because you hips and ankles have more degrees of freedom than the knee. Move your ankle or hip around for a moment. Then move you knee. Notice how many more options are available to the ankle and hip.

This puts your knee "a.k.a the middle man" at the mercy of the hip and ankle. Your body is like a tetor toter, if one end moves, the opposite end is going to do something as a result. 

So if you hip or ankle do not have the motion necessary to accomplish the task, it causes the knee to work overtime.

If your hip and ankle don't have stability and control, then the knee takes the brunt of the stress.

Your body needs controlled motion available throughout the lower extremity to distribute forces and start feeling better.

Listen to the video above, as I explain this in more detail. 

Real Solutions For Knee Pain| Ann Arbor, Mi | FREE Discovery Session|

About the Author: Dr. Greg Schaible is a physical therapist/strength coach specializing in athletic performance. He attended The University of Findlay, graduating in 2013 with his Doctorate of Physical Therapy (DPT). As a Track and Field athlete, he was as a 5x Division II All-American and 6x Division II Academic All-American. Greg is the owner of On Track Physiotherapy in Ann Arbor, Mi. You can stay up to date with helpful information and news on Facebook.

Is Plyometric Training Causing you knee Pain?

On Track PT and Performance featured this week on John Rusin Fitness Systems. In this article we go over how to keep your knees happy if your sport or training involves a lot of plyometric activity. Be sure to check it out and share it with a friend!